Courts in Cherokee County take prostitution and prostitution-related crimes very seriously. Cherokee County law also criminalizes the act of paying for or soliciting sexual services. Any person convicted under Georgia’s pandering statute can be sent to jail and may face stiff fines. On top of this, they will have a criminal record and their reputation in their community may suffer.

An experienced attorney could defend you in criminal court against all pandering charges, working to achieve a positive resolution to your case and to preserve your character at home and in society at large. Contact a Cherokee County solicitation lawyer today.

How Does the Law in Cherokee County Define Solicitation?

There is no crime specifically defined as “solicitation” under Georgia law. In place of this, Georgia defines the act of paying another person for sex as “pandering” under Georgia Code 16-6-12.

The exchange of money or something of value for sex does not have to actually take place for someone to be charged with pandering, and it is not uncommon for someone to be arrested after merely attempting to make such a deal. As with many criminal charges, an attempt can be considered just as serious as the act itself. Therefore, an attempted act of pandering is punished in the same way as a completed act. Individuals should speak with a Cherokee County solicitation lawyer to learn more.

Different Forms of Penalties

There are three potential forms of serious penalties for a violation of solicitation law in Cherokee County.

  • Criminal Punishments
  • Damage to Reputation
  • Asset Forfeiture

Criminal Punishments

First, a conviction for even the simplest form of pandering is treated as a misdemeanor of a “high and aggravated” nature. A conviction here may result in a jail term of up to one year and a fine of up to $5,000.

The penalties are much worse if the person solicited to perform sex acts is under 18 years old. According to Georgia Code 16-6-13, these convictions are considered felonies punishable by a minimum prison term of five years up to a maximum of 20 years. A minimum fine of $2,500 also applies.

The most serious cases are when the solicited person is under the age of 16. The minimum sentence is raised to 10 years with a maximum sentence of 30 years.

Damage to Reputation

A solicitation accusation affects a person’s reputation. A conviction for pandering of any sort requires the court to publish an article in the local newspaper outlining the facts of the case.

In addition, the convicted person’s mugshot will be added to the article. Guilty people are also required to submit to a sexually transmitted disease test, the results of which are shared with their spouse.

Asset Forfeiture

Finally, Georgia law allows the local prosecutor’s office to seize any personal property that was used in the commission of a crime. In cases of pandering, this can often include a defendant’s car, cash used to arrange the deal or even a person’s home.

A Cherokee County Solicitation Lawyer Can Help

Being charged with any crime is a serious matter. However, the consequences of a conviction for solicitation, or pandering, are especially harsh. Not only may you be looking at significant jail time and stiff fines, but your actions could also be published for the entire community to see.

An experienced Cherokee County solicitation lawyer understands the immense pressures that accompany these cases and could work to defend you in both the courtroom and the public eye.

From the very first hearing in a pandering case, important issues concerning a person’s freedom are decided. Do not take any unnecessary risks—call today to get started working on your case.